How do I reach support?

The best way to reach support is to send an email explaining your support need to Support@WeCountPeople.com

Can you help me decide the best counter for me to use?

Will the battery-operated counter need special batteries?

Great question! It depends on which battery-operated counter you decide to use.

The TotalCounterFF uses two 3.6 volt AA lithium batteries on the display side. These batteries can be found at Batteries Plus, Radio Shack, and our website. Prices can range from $9 to $15 per battery. Be careful if you find lower cost batteries on the web, because they may not provide full power or full current and may not last very long. The non-display side uses a standard 3.6 volt coin battery. The coin battery can be found at most retail stores which carry batteries.

The TotalCounterSF uses standard 3.6 volt coin batteries, one per side.

The TotalCounterIO, TotalCounterUSB and TotalCounterRF counters all use standard 1.5 volt AA batteries, 2 per side. So even though our counter may be a bit more expensive than a competitor counter using 3.6 volt batteries – you will save money each and every year on replacement batteries.

At what height should the counter be installed?

We typically recommend installing the counter at a height of 36 inches to count most children and people in wheel chairs and strollers.

If you do not wish to count children, and do not want to count shopping carts, then we would recommend an installation height of 52 inches.

You can install the sensor lower than 36 inches, but you may find that you sometimes count swinging arms. Be careful that you do not install at a low height that would allow counting of legs. Our counters are fast enough to do so.

What is an Infrared Beam-Break Counter?

Infrared beam-break people counters have been in use since the mid 1980’s. They are very popular because they are easy to install and don’t cost very much.

The infrared transmitter side (the side without the display) sends a safe and invisible infrared beam to the infrared receiver (the side with the display). When someone, or something, passes through this invisible beam, they “break” the beam and are counted.

Some IR Beam-Break counters are known as “non-directional” people counters because they do not separate the IN and OUT counts. So if someone walks in, then walks out, they will be counted twice….and you will need to divide the number on the display by 2 to arrive at a visitor count.

Directional Dual-Beam counters are available. These counters separate the IN and OUT counts, so there is no need to divide the count by 2.

The physics of a beam break people counter means that if two people walk through side-by-side, they will be counted as one. And if a group of people walk through at the same time, it is unlikely that all of them will be counted. ALL infrared beam-break and ALL infrared-reflected people counters work in the same way. On a single door entrance (typically 36″ wide), most people enter one at a time, so the counting accuracy is typical very high (93 to 95%). But on a double-door entrance – this typical accuracy can drop to 80 to 85%.

How accurate is an infrared beam-break counter?

The physics of a beam break people counter means that if two people walk through side-by-side, they will be counted as one. And if a group of people walk through at the same time, it is unlikely that all of them will be counted. ALL infrared beam-break and ALL infrared-reflected people counters work in the same way. On a single door entrance (typically 36″ wide), most people enter one at a time, so the counting accuracy is typical very high (93 to 95%). But on a double-door entrance – this typical accuracy can drop to 80 to 85%.